Tuesday, September 6, 2011

KC

KC-train

Look at the train!

After the State Fair, we continued onto Kansas City. It's supposedly the hipper little sister to St Louis, which is I think a pretty good description. We went to some good restaurants, and had time for one museum, the World War I museum.
WWImemorial1


I guess back in those days, Missouri was the obvious location for a World War I memorial/museum. I am definitely not a fan of all the glorification of war and gore, but it was not all that warmongery/gory, plus it was a really well curated museum, and a great history review lesson. Extra bonus, I took pictures of all the fiberarts-related stuff to share!

First of all, the uniforms. Most of the US uniforms had this detail where there is shaping in the upper front chest with darts. I have never seen that on regular clothes, but it makes perfect sense, since people are built in 3 dimensions, not 2. Patternmakers of the world, what is this type of dart called?
uniform1


I loved that so many of the old clothes, especially knitted garments, showed signs of repair/love. Here is a still-modern-looking crewneck pullover.
sweater

(The gun pointing to it is not cool, but it's impossible to crop out without cutting out the sweater sleeve.)

Here's a great schematic of all the patches for the different insignia for the US army. Back then, who made all the patches? Who makes them now? I like to think they are embroidered by hand still.
insignia


The French apparently sent back the sacks that held food aid, embroidered and decorated, in this case, with crochet lace.
sack-embroidery2

sack-embroidery


Close up. Amazing work!
crochet-edging


Closer to home, a Missourian woman made this quilt, made of fabric rectangles that one got for sending in coupons from cigarette boxes. Seriously, if there were nothing to knit or sew, woudn't you take up smoking too, just for the fabric scraps?
tobacco-quilt


The most prominent part of the museum is this very tall tower. There is, and always has been, an elevator inside, whew.
WWImemorial2


This is what is looks like, on the inside. The guides/docents at the museum were all kindly veteran types. One of them stopped the elevator so I could take the picture!
WWImemorial3
I LOVE this green.


Poppies, one for every 1000 people who died fighting in the war.
poppies


Somber, the next stop was a big gigantic pick me up, at a book store!
bookstore1


Holy guacamole! I want one of these in St Louis! Half Price Books! All the time! Inside is like a big chain bookstore, except everything is cheap.
bookstore2


Even everything in the big huge section of knitting and other crafty books.
bookstore3


I came away with a few goodies.
crafty-books

knitting-books


On the first day in KC, DH and I could not resist and checked our work schedules, and he found that through some hideous glitch, he had patients to see the next day. So, the next morning, we woke at the crack of dawn and drove all the way home. So that's it for vacation photos! Alack. At least I got some knitting done!
man-sweater1
A big ocean of stockinette, for the East Hale Cardigan.

3 comments:

Anonymous said...

Thanks so much for those photos! I visited the museum this spring, but had to rush through, so it was nice to get a chance to take a closer look at some of these objects. Did you get a look at the women's uniforms?

Those darts are called shoulder darts, and they were common in women's clothing as well, right up to the 1960s. For some reason they disappeared at that time. I think it may be because they tend to emphasize the chest, and the 1960s fashions are more columnar & less fitted.

Silvana

emicat said...

Thanks for sharing your photos from your trip. I looove half price books!

tina said...

Sitting here blogreading with a sandwich in hand, moments to spare. Yet I feel as if I've had a bit of edumacation----- thanks for the museum stop! Silvana is right, darts are darts. You can put them ANYWHERE it is just a matter of knowing your flat patterning skills! :)